Car insurance: take over percentages

Damage-free class – the reward for accident-free driving
Year after year, car insurance lowers the percentage that an insured person has to pay for his insurance – provided that he did not have an accident in the respective insurance year that the insurance company had to regulate, i.e. pay for. Every year corresponds to a damage -free class ( SF class ), the highest is SF class 25: 25 years of uninterrupted accident-free driving means the greatest possible discount, after that there is no further discount, only the possibility of once regulating an accident through the insurance company leave without the SF class being downgraded. The grandfather can transfer the acquired SF class to a relative, for example his granddaughter.

Fundamentals for taking over the percentages
How different percentages are transferred from a non-loss class is handled very differently by different insurers. A general answer can only be very incomplete – so please inform yourself at the respective insurance company with which the contractual relationship exists, how the transfer is regulated there.

Non-loss classes can be transferred, for example, within a close relationship: a family relationship or a civil partnership. In the example mentioned at the beginning, the percentages would pass to the granddaughter – with one significant limitation that applies to most insurers equally: The granddaughter can be categorized into the SF class that she has based on the length of her license. Those who have only had their driver’s license for three years cannot enter SF class 10!

One-way street – percentages can only be taken over once
In some cases, the transfer cannot be undone. That means: Should grandfather one day want to get behind the wheel of his own car, he starts from the insurance point of view as a novice driver – his old SF class now has the grandchild, at least it has the share that it would theoretically have had an experience yourself.

In the event that grandfather has died, you can only enter into the contract within one year of his death: the son, daughter, grandchildren can therefore take over his contract on the condition that the remaining heirs agree to this takeover. The consent must be documented in writing.

When do you lose car insurance coverage?

And if

*the vehicle was used for a different purpose than specified in the contract
*the driver no adequate license had
*there has been a constant increase in risk (eg worn tires)
Here is the rule of thumb: all new circumstances that make the occurrence of the insured event (accident) more likely, count as an increase in risk.
These circumstances must be communicated to the insurer in writing, especially if they belong to the circumstances that were addressed in the application.
*an unauthorized person has used the vehicle ( car theft )
*Insurance benefits are only limited if the car is used for other purposes than agreed (see special discounts ). For example, if the policyholder has agreed on a “ lady tariff ” and an accident is caused by a man behind the wheel, the insurer does not have to pay because the contractual terms have not been met.
*the vehicle to be officially approved not ride events is used, which depend on obtaining a maximum speed, or at *the corresponding test drives ( car race )
the vehicle outside Europe is used
Which countries include technical aspects to Europe should definitely against travel to EU countries not- be clarified with the insurance company.
*Driver flight is committed
With 40 million cars, the probability of causing an “expensive” accident is pretty low.
Anyone who would like to protect themselves against “huge damage” – according to the German Civil Code (LGB) you have unlimited liability for damage caused – this can be achieved with an approximately 2% higher premium.
*the policyholder has not paid the first or one-time premium on time (within three months)
*the policyholder did not pay the premium at the time of the accident
*the driver is unable to drive the vehicle safely due to the consumption of alcoholic beverages or other intoxicants
*Damage caused directly or indirectly by riot, civil unrest, war events, high-handed orders or earthquakes
*Nuclear damage arising

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